Change can be hard to recognize—and even harder to accept. That certainly seems to be the case with Cadillac. The division has shaken off the overstuffed glitz of its (admittedly highly profitable and, for a long time, quite popular) past. After a period of some identity confusion, Cadillac with the ATS and the CTS [see separate entry] has come out the other side, offering cars that out-BMW BMW. The ATS both in sedan and—even more so—in coupe form, drive with the poise and responsiveness that used to be a given in the BMW 3-series. Granted, the ATS is not perfect: The CUE interface is annoying and the back seat is pretty tight. But enthusiasts for years had no problem overlooking the frustration of iDrive and a cramped back seat in the BMW (both alleviated in today’s models). Why can’t enthusiasts do the same for the ATS? One suspects it’s not that they can’t overlook the car’s shortcomings in order to embrace its driving excellence, but that they’re unwilling to look in Cadillac’s direction at all. The ATS is a very different Cadillac from those that have gone before—a polar opposite, in fact. As we’re seeing with the disappointing sales of this anything-but-disappointing car, it’s the kind of change that many buyers are having a hard time coming to grips with.